Interior Designer Kitchen of the Week: Colorful Cookware Inspires a New Look (6 photos)

Interior Designer Kitchen of the Week: Colorful Cookware Inspires a New Look (6 photos)

A no-gray-allowed approach gives these avid cooks a design that’s as playful as it is functionalBecky HarrisNov 15, 2019Houzz Contributor. Hi there! I

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Interior Designer A no-gray-allowed approach gives these avid cooks a design that’s as playful as it is functionalBecky HarrisNov 15, 2019Houzz Contributor. Hi there! I live in a 1920s cottage in Atlanta that I’ll describe as “collected.”
I got into design via Landscape Architecture, which I studied at the University of Virginia. I’ve been writing about design online for quite a few years over at Hatch: The Design Public Blog.MoreSometimes the cookware inspires the cooking space. That was the case in this Edmonds, Washington, kitchen. “The client’s inspiration was based on her Le Creuset cookware. She liked their color and design and wanted her kitchen to reflect it,” says Loren Holmberg of Blox Construction. The result is a warm and lively space that inspires lots of use for those beloved pots and pans. Photos by WE StudioKitchen at a GlanceWho lives here: A couple who loves to cookLocation: Edmonds, WashingtonSize: About 120 square feet (11 square meters)Designer: Shannon Adamson Interior DesignContractor: Steve Layman, Blox ConstructionThe existing kitchen in the 1970s split-level home was dated and cut off from the other rooms. The window wall and the wall to the right contained the entire work area, and on the left side was an eat-in area that wasted a lot of space. This did not work for the homeowners, who are both avid cooks. Interior designer Shannon Adamson came up with a more functional layout that replaced the eat-in area with more work space. She also removed some unsightly soffits to make the room feel more open and clean-lined. They donated or recycled as many items as possible that were ripped out during the remodel. Hire a kitchen remodelerThe eat-in space had been nestled into this bay window area. The remodel opened up the kitchen to the adjacent dining room (just out of view to the left), eliminating the need for two eating spaces so close together. The curved edge of the peninsula eases the flow into the dining space and provides display space for cookbooks and favorite objects. Taking out the eat-in area allowed room for more countertop workspace, additional cabinet and display space, and a nice view outdoors for someone washing dishes. While the house doesn’t date back all the way to the midcentury modern era, the finishes and playfulness of that style suit the home. Warm cherry cabinets, colorful geometric backsplash tiles and streamlined metal hardware nod to the era. Silestone countertops in Eternal Statuario and a white apron-front sink contrast the cherry and add fresh, updated touches. Sink: Whitehaven, KohlerBrowse white farmhouse sinks in the Houzz ShopThe curves repeat on the open shelves across the room, perfect for displaying some of the much-loved La Creuset cookware that inspired the kitchen design.Shop for cookwareAnd speaking of that colorful cookware, it set the tone for the deep red-oranges on the backsplash tile too. The color of other walls in the space picks up the light green of some of the backsplash tiles. Using locally and regionally made materials was an important part of the process. Portland, Oregon, company Clayhaus Ceramics made the tile to Adamson’s custom specifications. The colors are Pacific, Brilliant White, Vermillion and Fiesta. The cabinets were custom-made in Springfield, Oregon.Find a local tile professional on HouzzThe range backsplash extends up under a new stainless steel range from Wolfe. Red knobs play off the bright colors of the tile and the teakettle, while the hardware plays off the appliances.
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