Education  students  training Google-Funded Library Programs Teaching Google-Provided Curricula

Education students training Google-Funded Library Programs Teaching Google-Provided Curricula

Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading! Google-Funded Library Programs Teaching Google-Provided Cu

Submit guest post submit an article submit article guest author How American Land Became A Personal Prop
Submit guest post submit an article submit article guest author Ep 34. The Future of LNG and the Energy Industry | Guest, Bryan Cox with BCLNGA | Crownsmen Partners
Submit guest post submit an article submit article guest author Conan O’Brien and Dana Carvey dropping new podcast series this summer

Education students training

Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

Google-Funded Library Programs Teaching Google-Provided Curricula

Posted
by

msmash

on Thursday November 07, 2019 @03:55PM

from the closer-look dept.

theodp writes: Q. What’s the difference between Andrew Carnegie and Google? A. Andrew Carnegie used his wealth to help build libraries, while Google’s using its wealth to get libraries to help build its brands. “In advance of Computer Science Education Week (CSEdWeek),” announced the American Library Association (ALA), “an annual event to get students excited about coding, ALA will be awarding $300 mini-grants to school and public libraries that facilitate a program for youth during Computer Science Education Week, December 9-15, 2019, using Google’s CS First Hour of Code activity. This year, youth can use their imagination to turn a real-life hero into a superhero using code. Code Your Hero is an activity that honors the everyday heroes in our students’ lives who use their powers to better their communities. Libraries Ready to Code is an initiative of the American Library Association (ALA) and sponsored by Google, which aims to ensure libraries have the resources, capacity, and inspiration to embrace activities that promote computational thinking (CT) and coding among our nation’s youth.”

Last month, the ALA announced it had received a $2 million Google.org grant to develop library entrepreneurship centers. In advance of last December’s CSEdWeek, Google announced a $1 million sponsorship to the ALA, creating a pool of micro-funds that local libraries could access to bring digital skills training to their community in conjunction with the Libraries Lead with Digital Skills and Libraries Ready to Code ALA-Google joint initiatives.

Duct tape is like the force. It has a light side, and a dark side, and
it holds the universe together …
— Carl Zwanzig

Working…

Read More

COMMENTS

WORDPRESS: 0
DISQUS: 0